Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

READING


Old Testament: Genesis 37:12-24
Morning Psalms: Psalms 45
New Testament: 1 Corinthians 1:20-31
Gospel: Mark 1:14-28
Evening Psalms: Psalms 47, 48

DEVOTIONAL


“Where is the wise person? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? Therefore, as it is written: ‘Let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.’” 1 Corinthians: 1:20-31

“Where is the wise person? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? Therefore, as it is written: ‘Let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.’” 1 Corinthians: 1:20-31 The Bible often strikes me as a thoroughly modern book. It’s not just that it’s timeless, but that it’s timely. Today’s Gospel reading is a case in point. It is as if Paul, writing 2000 years ago, knew exactly what the world would be like today. In 1 Corinthians, we come face to face with the stark contrast between the way of the world and the way of God, between the wisdom of the world and the wisdom of God.

The world says, “Only the strong survive.”
God says, “Whoever loses his life for me will save it.”
 
‘The world says, “An eye for eye.”
God says, “Turn the other cheek.”
 
The world says, “He who dies with the most toys wins.”
God says, “It is more blessed to give than to receive.”
 
The world uses “intelligence” to deny God.
God uses our foolishness to point us to our need for Jesus.
  And let’s face it; when all is said and done, who of us can’t be pretty darn foolish?

We hear so much about “post-traumatic stress syndrome,” but what about post-traumatic growth syndrome? It’s weakness—the hard stuff in life—that is often the greatest catalyst to our spiritual (and personal) growth and development. One way of understanding this is that it is often our weaknesses, not our strengths, that make it easier for other people to love us.

Finally, this passage tells us that we don’t need to be wise by human standards, or influential, or part of the in-crowd. The Bible is the story of people who were flawed but used by God nonetheless. Their biggest asset was not their ability but rather their availability to be used by God.

And so the question is, no matter what we think our faults and failings might be, will we let God use them—and us—to achieve his purposes in the world?
CRM


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